Living in a Conflict Zone: Story of Aging in the Southern Part of Thailand

Abstract

Conflict in the southern border provinces of Thailand has been reported for decades. This paper aims to explain health conditions, social well-being, and compare between Thai-Buddhists and Thai-Muslims. 302 of the elderly in Thepha, Songkla were interviewed. We found that, most of them were young old, still active, and 96.8% could perform ADL and IADL tasks, perfectly. Unfortunately, approximately 18.4% were demented. By means of cultural pluralism, the Muslims were more illiterates but the income was higher. The Buddhists participated in social and community activities more than the Muslims (1.7 times). Health inequality was also mentioned, as 90% of the Muslims used Universal Coverage Scheme Health Card, where the Buddhists were more benefits from State Enterprise Office. This means the Buddhists have more opportunities in health accessibility, health-seeking behavior, and referral system. By the way, perception in good quality of life of Muslims were more likely to be higher than the Buddhists, as the Buddhists has worrisome in the conflict in the area. Thus, the concepts of health inequality and social security should be mentioned and more developed for social health and well-being of the elderly in this area.



Author Information
Junya Pattaraarchachai, Chulabhorn International College of Medicine, Thammasat University, Thailand
Kanvee Viwatpanich, Chulabhorn International College of Medicine, Thammasat University, Thailand
Taweeporn Sittiracha, Chulabhorn International College of Medicine, Thammasat University, Thailand
Sermkool Akarapanyakool, Chulabhorn International College of Medicine, Thammasat University, Thailand

Paper Information
Conference: AGen2016
Stream: Aging and Gerontology

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