How Supervisor Can Retain Potential Employees: Psychological Empowerment as a Mediator

Abstract

This study aims to examine how psychological empowerment can explain the role of supervisor support in reducing turnover intention especially for prospective employees. Turnover intention is an individual’s desire to leave the company or current place of work. Psychological empowerment is an individual’s intrinsic motivation to feel empowered at work. Psychological empowerment has four aspects: meaning, competence, self-determination, and impact. Supervisor support is an employee’s perception of the extent to which superiors provide information, emotion, and assistance. Participants in this study were 150 employees who work in the field of insurance and technology & information with a minimum working period of 6 months, have a boss and minimum education of senior high school or equivalent. The data collected by using turnover intention scale, psychology empowerment scale and supervisor support scale. The design of this research is quantitative research. The result of this study show that there is a role of perceived supervisor support on turnover intention and it was also found that psychological empowerment can fully mediate between perceived supervisor support and turnover intention.



Author Information
Nadira Izminanda, Universitas Tarumanagara, Indonesia
P. Tommy Y. S. Suyasa, Universitas Tarumanagara, Indonesia

Paper Information
Conference: ACP2024
Stream: Industrial Organization and Organization Theory

This paper is part of the ACP2024 Conference Proceedings (View)
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To cite this article:
Izminanda N., & Suyasa P. (2024) How Supervisor Can Retain Potential Employees: Psychological Empowerment as a Mediator ISSN: 2187-4743 – The Asian Conference on Psychology & the Behavioral Sciences 2024 Official Conference Proceedings https://doi.org/10.22492/issn.2187-4743.2024.23
To link to this article: https://doi.org/10.22492/issn.2187-4743.2024.23


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Posted by James Alexander Gordon