Using Play Pedagogy for Students’ English Oral and Reading Ability in Taiwan Primary School’s After Program

Abstract

This study focused on elementary school students in the middle to lower grade levels (Age 6-9) who were part of an after-school English program in Pingtung County, Taiwan. The aim was to investigate the impact of English vocabulary game-based instruction on their English speaking and reading abilities. Employing an experimental research design, this study conducted a one-semester experiment with weekly 30-minute sessions. The students were divided into an experimental group (receiving vocabulary game instruction) and a control group (receiving traditional teaching methods).
The research problems are: (1) Analyze the effectiveness of English vocabulary game-based instruction in improving students' English-speaking fluency and expressive skills. (2) Evaluate the impact of English vocabulary game-based instruction on students' reading comprehension, vocabulary recognition, and reading fluency.
The results revealed that English vocabulary game-based instruction significantly enhanced students' English speaking and reading abilities. The experimental group exhibited substantial improvements in speaking fluency, expressive skills, reading comprehension, vocabulary recognition, and reading fluency. In summary, this instructional method not only ignited students' learning interest but also exhibited promise for enhancing their language skills.
This study recommends future research that delves deeper into the long-term effects of vocabulary game-based instruction in English classrooms and explores potential differences among students of varying age groups. These findings can provide valuable insights for curriculum and instructional design.



Author Information
Ching-wen Kao, National University of Tainan, Taiwan

Paper Information
Conference: ACEID2024
Stream: Teaching Experiences

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Posted by James Alexander Gordon