Exploring the Impact of Envy as a Moderator Between FoMO and Social Media Fatigue

Abstract

The emergence of various social media platforms with complex features and diverse devices has led to the fear of missing out (FoMO) on using these facilities, ultimately resulting in exhaustion. The fear, anxiety, or worry of missing out on various opportunities and information often drives excessive social media usage. Building on previous research, FoMO is frequently associated with social media fatigue, yet there has been no research to date that considers envy as a moderator. This study aims to examine the relationship between FoMO and social media fatigue moderated by envy among social media users. A survey was conducted using a quantitative methodology with participants aged 18 and above who have a minimum of two accounts. This is based on the fact that social media users in Indonesia are predominantly aged 18 and above, and the wide variety of social media platforms leads individuals to have more than one account. This analysis aims to investigate the impact of the moderation variable using Hayes' PROCESS Model 1 in SPSS 27. The results of this study indicate that malicious envy significantly serves as a moderator between FoMO and social media fatigue, especially in the group where malicious tendencies are at a low level. This is in contrast to benign, which shows not significant. This research is expected to contribute to understanding the dynamics of the emergence of fatigue feelings in using social media and the emotions that exacerbate these feelings of fatigue.



Author Information
Muhammad Nurrifqi Fuadi, University of Gadjah Mada, Indonesia

Paper Information
Conference: ACP2024
Stream: General Psychology

This paper is part of the ACP2024 Conference Proceedings (View)
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To cite this article:
Fuadi M. (2024) Exploring the Impact of Envy as a Moderator Between FoMO and Social Media Fatigue ISSN: 2187-4743 – The Asian Conference on Psychology & the Behavioral Sciences 2024 Official Conference Proceedings https://doi.org/10.22492/issn.2187-4743.2024.15
To link to this article: https://doi.org/10.22492/issn.2187-4743.2024.15


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Posted by James Alexander Gordon