Students’ Use of Social Networking Sites for Educational Purposes

Abstract

This study responds to the modern global concerns in the field of media, and it seeks benefiting from social media in teaching subjects of media as being considered as media and communicational methods in the first place, and as being considered as an educational method in which the main elements and constituents of modern educational approaches are available. This study seeks getting acquainted with media students’ opinions on the social media as an educational method, its merits and demerits as well as the most apparent elements, which can be used within an educational curriculum on social media. Moreover, results of the study clarified that the most students’ attitudes towards social medias an educational method were negative; especially in terms of saying that teaching curricula on social media needs capabilities, which are unavailable in our universities, and there insufficient qualified professors in our universities to teach curricula on social media. Results of the study indicated that there is no statistically significant relation in terms of students’ opinions towards the merits of social media as an educational method and there is no statistically significant relation between male and female students in terms of their opinions towards the demerits of social media as an educational method.



Author Information
Fawzia Al-Ali, University of Sharjah, United Arab Emirates

Paper Information
Conference: ACEID2024
Stream: Educational Research

This paper is part of the ACEID2024 Conference Proceedings (View)
Full Paper
View / Download the full paper in a new tab/window


To cite this article:
Al-Ali F. (2024) Students’ Use of Social Networking Sites for Educational Purposes ISSN: 2189-101X – The Asian Conference on Education & International Development 2024 Official Conference Proceedings https://doi.org/10.22492/issn.2189-101X.2024.3
To link to this article: https://doi.org/10.22492/issn.2189-101X.2024.3


Comments & Feedback

Place a comment using your LinkedIn profile

Comments

Share on activity feed

Powered by WP LinkPress

Share this Research

Posted by James Alexander Gordon