Investigating Procedures for Translating Vietnamese Noodle Dishes Into English: Application to Language Teaching

Abstract

The purpose aims at finding translation procedures for rendering Vietnamese noodles - a world well-known cuisine - into English in order to apply in teaching and learning English language skills in general and Translation in particular for EFL (English as Foreign Language) students at The University of Danang in Vietnam in the current context of integration and cultural communication. The background of study is mainly based on translation procedures stated by Newmark P (1988) and Armstrong N. (2005). Translation procedures such as shift (i.e. structure shift and class shift) and equivalence (e.g. cultural equivalence, descriptive equivalence and functional equivalence) are employed to analyze and find out the result of the study qualitatively. The data with different subtypes of two main kinds of Vietnamese noodles, such as Pho and Bun written in English will be collected from prestigious resources such as Guidebooks by Lonely Planet, Cable News Network (CNN) Travel Guide and some other related material or publication, like dictionaries or textbooks. Then a qualitative as well as quantitative analysis of totally 23 different subtypes of Vietnamese noodles, comprising 11 kinds of pho and 12 types of bun having been appropriately and cautiously collected for the research will be conducted so as to discus and find the result of the research. The outcomes are expected to be useful and broadly applicable not only for Vietnamese ESL students but also for ESL students from many other countries in association with transforming their own cuisines into English by means of concerned translation procedures.



Author Information
Thi Tan Le, The University of Danang, Vietnam

Paper Information
Conference: ECLL2022
Stream: Translation and Interpretation

This paper is part of the ECLL2022 Conference Proceedings (View)
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Posted by amp21