Gender Differences in Relationships Among Conscious and Unconscious Cognition of Culpability of Bullying Victims and Accepting Attitudes Toward Bullying

Abstract

Examining the validity of the Implicit Association Test for assessing unconscious cognition of culpability of bullying victims, including the idea that bullying victims are also responsible for being bullied (Hori et al., 2020a), indicated significant gender differences in the subscale scores of the scale for measuring accepting attitudes toward bullying (Shinto & Saito, 2001). However, gender differences in correlations between conscious and unconscious cognition of culpability of bullying victims and the subscale scores of the scale for measuring accepting attitudes toward bullying have not been investigated to date. The present study examined gender differences in the correlations among these variables. The data partly overlap with those of Hori et al. (2020a, b), Fukui et al. (2020), and Koyama et al. (2020). The correlation analysis by gender indicated that the unconscious cognition of culpability of bullying victims was not correlated with conscious cognition in men or women. Conversely, unconscious cognition had significant weak correlations with the following subscale scores of accepting attitudes toward bullying only in men: the tendency to think that mild bullying is necessary (r =.19, p <.05, women: r =-.01, n.s.) and the tendency to think that we should not help bullying victims (r =.31, p <.001, women: r =-.01, n.s.), whereas no correlations were shown in women. Moreover, both coefficients in men were significantly larger than those in women. These results indicate that unconscious cognition of culpability of bullying victims is correlated with conscious aspects of accepting attitudes toward bullying only in men.



Author Information
Takashi Hori, Graduate School of Humanities of Konan University, Japan
Satoko Koyama, Saku Mental Clinic, Japan
Yoshikazu Fukui, Konan University, Japan

Paper Information
Conference: ACP2021
Stream: General Psychology

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Posted by amp21