Experts and Students Advocate Andragogical Insights in Learning Beyond Pedagogy

Abstract

Past research indicates that experts with more specialized knowledge criticized educational implementations and curriculum content sharply. Whether the intensity of these criticisms originates from domain-specific knowledge or expertise is unknown, as experts are highly independent, internally motivated, and self-directed learners.

This study hypothesizes that when adults with specialized knowledge comment on educational implementations, they may project their own intellectual competences onto their judgments, in a phenomenon called as intellectual mirroring. The purpose of the study is to investigate to what extent intellectual mirroring has been hampered by an over-reliance on pedagogical or andragogical insights.

The study employed the qualitative research approach, in which the qualitative data were obtained from a series of focus group discussions and individual interviews with primary and secondary school students (Nfocusgroup=8) and teachers (Ninterview=5), who live in the UK. The content analyses identified 13 sub-themes under 6 categories for teachers; and 11 sub-themes under 6 categories for students.

The analyses showed that the nature and intensity of elder students’ criticisms were highly similar to those of experts’ previously found. Older than 14-year-old students claimed more independence in their learning journey and showed high motivation for specific topics, which can be interpreted by andragogical insights. However, teachers questioned students’ competences for self-directed learning, and emphasized curriculum-based requirements, which is driven by pedagogical insights. As opposed to the teachers, from the students’ point of view, intellectual mirroring is not the consequence of domain-specific knowledge or expertise.



Author Information
Selma Dündar-Coecke, University College London, United Kingdom

Paper Information
Conference: ECE2020
Stream: Learning Experiences

This paper is part of the ECE2020 Conference Proceedings (View)
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