Relations Between Intention to Self-Change and Cognitions of Benefit and Cost to Self-Change in University Students

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine relations between intention to self-change and cognitions of benefit and cost to self-change in university students. Although it is well known that many university students desire to change themselves, only few studies have examined how they perceive the benefits and costs to their self-change. The hypothesis of this study was that the intention to self-change would positively correlate to the cognitions of benefit to self-change. The questionnaire survey was conducted to 91 Japanese university students (men=39, women=49, non-respondents=3; mean age=18.66, SD=2.08) in October and November 2012. They responded to the intention to self-change items (5 items, 5-likert) and filled in the blanks of cognitions of benefit/cost toward self-change/maintenance. The range of the number of the descriptions was zero to three. In the benefits of change, the total number of the descriptions was 116, and the descriptions which appeared most frequently were “self-growth”. In the costs of change, the total number of the descriptions was 70, and the most frequent descriptions were “consumption of energy”. On the other hand, in the benefits of maintenance, the total number of the descriptions was 86, and the descriptions which appeared most frequently were “comfortableness”. In the costs of maintenance, the total number was 96, and the most frequent descriptions were “increase of self-denial”. Results of correlation analysis between scores of the intention to self-change (mean score=3.39, SD=0.77; α=0.85) and the number of the descriptions of benefit/cost toward self-change/maintenance indicated that the intention to self-change was positively correlated only to the costs of self-maintenance (r=.24, p<.05). To conclude, the intention to self-change would be elevated by the cognitions of costs toward unchanging rather than of benefits to changing.



Author Information
Yuta Chishima, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Japan

Paper Information
Conference: ACP2013
Stream: Psychology

This paper is part of the ACP2013 Conference Proceedings (View)
Full Paper
View / Download the full paper in a new tab/window


Posted by amp21