Decoding the Name-Recall Conundrum a Novel Perspective on Cognitive Processing and Enhancement Strategies

Abstract

This paper investigates the prevalent issue of forgetting names immediately after introductions, a problem evidenced by an 89% failure rate among a sample size of 458 individuals. We propose that the root cause of this memory lapse is not an inherent issue with memory retention or retrieval. Instead, it relates to a specific cognitive phenomenon whereby the verbal information (the name) triggers an internal visualization of a previously known individual associated with that name. This internal image, superimposed upon the visual perception of the newly introduced person, creates a disconnect between the verbal and visual components, leading to a lack of memorization. We argue that this isn't a memory failure, but an information classification issue. Initial experiments indicate that making individuals aware of the internal visual component upon introduction and training them with a technique described in this paper can effectively facilitate name recall. Our findings shed light on this overlooked cognitive phenomenon and introduce new prospects for cognitive enhancement and education beyond memory skills.



Author Information
Leonard Bernau, Science 21 Foundation, Czech Republic
Tomáš Benka, Science 21 Foundation, Czech Republic

Paper Information
Conference: ACP2024
Stream: Psychology and Education

This paper is part of the ACP2024 Conference Proceedings (View)
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To cite this article:
Bernau L., & Benka T. (2024) Decoding the Name-Recall Conundrum a Novel Perspective on Cognitive Processing and Enhancement Strategies ISSN: 2187-4743 – The Asian Conference on Psychology & the Behavioral Sciences 2024 Official Conference Proceedings https://doi.org/10.22492/issn.2187-4743.2024.3
To link to this article: https://doi.org/10.22492/issn.2187-4743.2024.3


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Posted by James Alexander Gordon