Motivation in Learning English as a Second Language Among the Grade 10 Students at Imus National High School

Abstract

Learning a language is most likely to occur when second language students “want to learn.” Gardner and Lambert (1959) proposed two orientations of motivation in second language learning: (1) “integrative motivation” or the motivation to learn a second language to integrate into the target language community; and (2) “instrumental motivation” or learning a second language for a more a practical purpose. Thus, the main goal of this study is to identify and to investigate on the second language learning motivation of the Grade 10 students at Imus National High School by using the modified version of Gardner’s Attitude and Motivation Test Battery as the instrument of this study. In the end, it is revealed that the respondents were both significantly influenced by instrumental and integrative motivations to learn English as a second language. It is also revealed that the level of instrumental motivation and integrative motivation of the female respondents did not differ significantly from the male respondents. The study hopes to offer opportunities that will help in augmenting the second language classroom environment and in preparing operative language teaching approaches for optimum second language learning.



Author Information
Brandon Parrenas, Imus National High School, Philippines

Paper Information
Conference: ECLL2022
Stream: Psychology of the learner

This paper is part of the ECLL2022 Conference Proceedings (View)
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To cite this article:
Parrenas B. (2022) Motivation in Learning English as a Second Language Among the Grade 10 Students at Imus National High School ISSN: 2188-112X The European Conference on Language Learning 2022: Official Conference Proceedings https://doi.org/10.22492/issn.2188-112X.2022.4
To link to this article: https://doi.org/10.22492/issn.2188-112X.2022.4


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Posted by James Alexander Gordon