Professional Peer Review and Value in Academic Writing: Implications for EAP Course Design

Abstract

For academics and professional researchers, peer review is an accepted element of their working practice. Regular submission to journals (predominantly English-language journals) is an expectation driven by intrinsic and extrinsic factors to create knowledge and value. Those who submit papers face a great deal of evaluative procedures and criteria that must be met which are additionally determined by the role of the reviewing committee or single reviewer. Submissions are not only assessed for their research and argumentation but also for the quality of their language. Importantly, what is generated from this co-drafting exchange is some insight into the language cultures of academic life. In recent years, discourse analysts have paid more attention to the language, procedures and content of this peer review interaction. While it has been acknowledged that these epistemological and discoursal practices can be enormously useful to people entering any respective research community, focus is lacking on how this insight might support the wider spectrum of academic communication and learning. What may be underappreciated is how these practices may shape and cultivate the learner experience for students entering higher educational settings in English. From a pragmatic view, this presentation looks at how these values might be understood, utilised, and subsequently, filter down into other forms of EAP course curriculums, activities and assessments to create more authentic, value-driven course design.



Author Information
Richard Arber, Kwansei Gakuin University, Japan

Paper Information
Conference: ACL2022
Stream: Language Acquisition

The full paper is not available for this title


Video Presentation


Comments & Feedback

Place a comment using your LinkedIn profile

Comments

Share on activity feed

Powered by WP LinkPress

Share this Research

Posted by amp21