Letting Students Explore What It Takes to Become a Good Communicator – A Metacognitive Approach to Promote Language Learning

Abstract

When it comes to teaching speaking skills in a foreign language classroom, instructing grammatical knowledge, building up vocabulary and formulated expressions, and practicing model conversations can be some of the useful teaching methods. However, we need to ask ourselves if our classroom instructions are designed to help students synthesize that fragmentary knowledge into practical knowledge for real-life conversational occasions. The conversation is a spontaneous activity affected by many elements contributed by the participants, such as their language proficiency, their relationships with each other, existing knowledge on the topic discussed, and so on. Thus, students must be trained to acquire skills that allow them to flexibly adapt to casual conversational situations in collaboration with other participants. Taking this into account, this research focuses on the metacognitive effects of an instructional method that incorporates an experiential learning framework. This method intends to foster students’ practical conversational skills in English through phased collaborative reflections on their free talks with their peers. Through metacognitive reflections on their performances, students came to see for themselves what it takes to become a good communicator.



Author Information
Yumi Gomez Chikamori, Seitoku University, Japan

Paper Information
Conference: ACE2021
Stream: Teaching Experiences

This paper is part of the ACE2021 Conference Proceedings (View)
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To cite this article:
Chikamori Y. (2022) Letting Students Explore What It Takes to Become a Good Communicator – A Metacognitive Approach to Promote Language Learning ISSN: 2186-5892 The Asian Conference on Education 2021: Official Conference Proceedings https://doi.org/10.22492/issn.2186-5892.2022.8
To link to this article: https://doi.org/10.22492/issn.2186-5892.2022.8


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