An Exploratory Study on Workers’ Characteristics Affecting the Use of Different Acting Strategies in Emotional Labor

Abstract

There are two acting strategies in emotional labor: surface acting and deep acting. Previous studies have shown that surface acting has negative effects, such as depression, burnout, and increased turnover of workers. For deep acting, the findings are inconsistent with both positive and negative effects being reported. In addition, these acting strategies are thought to be used according to the environment the worker is in, the situation at that time, and the personality characteristics of the worker himself/herself. However, there are still many unclear aspects about what specifically affects the use of the worker’s acting strategy. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively as well as qualitatively examine the recognition and use of acting strategies by emotional labor workers. Semi-structured interviews and web questionnaires were carried out for 13 counselors and 4 telephone operators related to insurance claims at an employee assistance program company. In the semi-structured interview, the sense and use of the acting strategy were asked. In the web questionnaire, the Emotional Labor Scale-Japanese version (Sekiya & Yukawa, 2014) was administered in which demographic details, such as educational history, work history, and years of experience, were also asked. As a result, it was found that the tendency to use either of the acting strategies differed depending on the type of work. Furthermore, it was suggested that attitudes toward emotional labor may differ depending on an individual's educational background and the presence of the supervisor, even in the same job category.



Author Information
Sae Nakagawa, Advantage Risk Management Co., Ltd, Japan
Daiki Sekiya, Tokyo Seitoku University, Japan

Paper Information
Conference: ACP2021
Stream: Qualitative/Quantitative Research in any other area of Psychology

This paper is part of the ACP2021 Conference Proceedings (View)
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