If You Know What I Mean: Rendering the Causative in Japanese and Croatian

Abstract

One of the things expressions “make” and “let” have in common is that they can be used to express causative meaning in a sentence. Some languages show causative markedness more clearly than the others – for example, the Japanese causative marker -sase undeniably signals the causative nature of a sentence. Other languages, such as for example Croatian, do not. This research focuses on the expression of various meanings and nuances a Japanese causative sentence may be used to carry, and how these meanings are expressed in Croatian, and vice versa. The research centers on the survey (in progress) being conducted amongst Croatian speakers of Japanese (i.e. students/learners, and former students/learners of Japanese). The working hypothesis is that causative meanings not falling into the category of “basic meanings” (i.e. coercion and permission) may present a challenge in understanding and expressing the meaning of a Japanese sentence in Croatian, which does not employ a fixed causative suffix such as -sase in expressing causation. The most common phrases used by the participants of the survey in order to render the Japanese -saseru and -temorau sentence meanings into (and from) Croatian will be analysed, touching upon the nuances carried in the expressions.
Through this research the author aims to illuminate the ways Japanese causative meaning is expressed in Croatian, and to highlight the sentence meanings that present a difficulty in the transfer of meaning according to the answers given by the survey participants.



Author Information
Petra Jaklin, University of Tsukuba, Japan

Paper Information
Conference: ACL2021
Stream: Linguistics

This paper is part of the ACL2021 Conference Proceedings (View)
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