Teacher Candidates’ Experiences With Distant Learning in the Initial Year of COVID-19

Abstract

Teacher preparation programs across the globe grapple with the struggles of educating prospective teachers in the era of the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods of instruction include distance learning, hybrid models, or simulation activities. As teacher educators utilize novel instructional approaches to prepare teacher candidates for classroom instruction, challenges emerge, and lessons are learned, but what are they? Research on pandemic teacher education is new and scarce. This multiple case study investigation, grounded in situated learning theory (Lave & Wenger 1991), explores how 12 undergraduate, elementary education teacher candidates explored teaching in a distant learning environment and how they sought to improve student engagement. Findings gleaned from focus groups, and self-reflection narratives suggest strategies for student engagement specific to online classroom instruction. The research offers recommendations how teacher preparation programs may respond to the benefits and challenges that rise with distant learning and increased use of technology in the classroom.



Author Information
Monica Smith Gonzalez, University of Hawaii, United States
Nicole Schlaack, University of Hawaii, United States

Paper Information
Conference: IICEHawaii2021
Stream: Teaching Experiences

This paper is part of the IICEHawaii2021 Conference Proceedings (View)
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Posted by amp21