Influence of Demographic Characteristics on Subjective Well-Being of Older Adults

Abstract

Research into well-being of older adults is at advanced stage the world over. Most of the studies are conducted in the west. A few studies done in Kenya have focused on older adults’ abuse and vulnerability. Furthermore, these studies have used younger populations, thus lack self-reporting by the older adults themselves. The current study sought to determine the level of subjective well-being of older adults and how data related to the population and within groups influence the subjective well-being of older adults. Data was collected from person (n=140, >65yrs) participating in the older persons cash transfer programme that serves the non-pensionable and aged Kenyans living in Kajulu ward, Kisumu County. Findings revealed that the older adults experienced low levels of subjective well-being, low levels of positive affect and low levels of negative affect and were dissatisfied with life. The findings further revealed that being married, having own source of income, attaining secondary school education and poor self-perceived health, significantly influenced subjective well-being. Relative absence of negative affect strongly predicted subjective well-being, followed by presence of positive affect and finally the dimension of satisfaction with life. The demographic characteristics did not reveal themselves as predictive variables in this study. Understanding the dynamics, emotional and cognitive processes of older adults may be useful in designing interventions, strategies and policy programs that could enhance subjective well-being of older adults.



Author Information
Emmy Ingaiza, Maseno University, Kenya
Margaret Disiye, Maseno University, Kenya
Peter Onderi, Maseno University, Kenya

Paper Information
Conference: AGen2021
Stream: Aging and Gerontology

This paper is part of the AGen2021 Conference Proceedings (View)
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Posted by amp21