Health Consideration in Architectural Design: An Interrelation Between Architecture and Neuroscience

Abstract

Neuroarchitecture is a new frontier in architecture that lies between the interrelation of neuroscience and architecture. The aim of this research is to understand and accumulate factual knowledge on the impact of architectural design in human perception and judgment while monitoring brain activity using electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings. To achieve this, the experiment has been separated into two parts: the observation part and the judgment part - both consisting of 3 sessions of pictures of indoor built environment categorized by color, proportions, and texture. To present the pictures and achieve the collection of information from the judgment, we have used a digitalized semantic differential method using a bipolar rating scale, whereas to monitor human brain activity we have used NeuroSky mind-wave mobile device. Subjects have been exposed to a visual stimulation while the selection of the pictures has taken into consideration cultural background, a range of colors from monochromatic to colorful and from bright to pastel, rooms of classical golden section proportions and contemporary approaches, as well as various textures. Results showed a judgment and observation impact varying from environments with bright and pastel colors, rough and soft texture as well as classical proportions and Japanese traditional rooms. This study provides an opportunity to improve the approach to architectural design, placing a primary focus on the user’s well-being.



Author Information
Dea Luma, The University of Tokyo, Japan
Yoshiyuki Kawazoe, The University of Tokyo, Japan

Paper Information
Conference: ACP2020
Stream: Neuroscience

This paper is part of the ACP2020 Conference Proceedings (View)
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