Citizenship Responsibility Higher Learning: Combining The Spiritual-Cultural, Rights-Responsibilities, and Economics of a Civic Development Higher Learning Thru a Sociology In English

Abstract

Blanton (1992) argues that education often violates the deepest needs of the human spirit by (1) alienating and boring or dulling teachers and students, and or by (2) failing to address in any meaningful ways the real issues of importance in our lives. As higher educators, when we enter the classroom, we bring with us both our physicality and our spirituality.  We can choose to reflect upon and embrace, or avoid and ignore, those questions we live with every day, and how we are living them.  Education as Kurth-Schai (2003) argues, must light a path or paths for people to effect social change.A CLIL (content integrated language learning) sociology in English framework at the Japanese university has the potential to teach class participants the value of a cooperative and collaborative higher learning that is engaged with knowledge and communcation, but which is based on valuing (phronesis) rather than knowledge or communication per se.  Integrated CLIL citizenship learning can help students - and teachers - see schooling as micro interaction of connected individuals and groups, and as a macro social system in which they, the participants, have what Forbes (2005) refers to as, responsibility to the advancement of their society, and responsibility for their society. This paper presentation will give both applied linguistics-language learning and social science support for a CLIL as outlined above.  The presenter will also give some details of the conception in practice of such an approach.



Author Information
Alan Brady, Kwansei Gakuin, Japan

Paper Information
Conference: ACE2013
Stream: Education

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Posted by amp21