Whose Role is it to Develop Secondary Students as Self-regulated Learners? A Study Exploring Student, Parent and Teacher Perceptions

Abstract

This paper draws on data from a doctoral study exploring how schools approach the development of self-regulated learning (SRL) for secondary school students. Self-regulation is becoming increasingly important as we move towards technologically driven self-directed learning environments, where greater amounts of autonomous learning may be necessary.  Equipping students with self-regulation skills that help them navigate the increasingly complex and demanding mire of school academic expectations and assessments in a way that makes their school experience more efficient, less stressful and ultimately more rewarding, has been demonstrated to be a worthwhile pursuit (Zimmerman, 2002). The research presented in this paper explores students, parents and teachers' attitudes, beliefs, experiences and perceptions around the development of SRL in contemporary secondary schools and in particular the perceived roles of students, parents and teachers. The findings emphasize the need for schools to clarify roles and determine explicitly how the goal of developing self-regulated learners is to be met by the school. This research demonstrates the need for schools to communicate the expected roles for parents, teachers and students in developing self-regulated learners, in order to ensure the community has a shared understanding of the approach taken by the school. The need for all parties to receive training and support in developing SRL, to ensure they have appropriate tools to fulfil their roles, is also highlighted.  To date there has been little exploration of the attitudes, beliefs and actual experiences of students, parents and teachers with respect to SRL, especially in contemporary, Australian secondary contexts. This study therefore leads to greater insights of the roles each group may play in developing SRL, challenging traditional assumptions as to where responsibility for developing SRL may lie in contemporary schools.



Author Information
Prue Salter, University of Technology, Australia

Paper Information
Conference: ACE2013
Stream: Education

This paper is part of the ACE2013 Conference Proceedings (View)
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