Get Out of Your Comfort Zone: Externalization Taxonomy as an Implementation Tool for Future Designers

Abstract

As global warming accelerates, buildings currently account for 39% of energy-related carbon dioxide emissions annually. Architecture, however, is increasingly designed as hermetically sealed boxes, requiring mechanical support, which in turn further contributes to the greenhouse gas emissions warming up our planet. In addition to disassociating from the natural environment, this conventional approach also creates spaces where people disconnect themselves from their communities. In this project, I will examine what spaces could be externalized, removed from mechanical support, and how in doing so would provide environmental and social benefits that contribute greatly to the vibrancy and longevity of architecture and its communities. Current literature addresses various aspects of externalization, but most are missing critical vocabulary and design taxonomy. To fill this gap, I aim to develop an online interactive externalization pattern book that can support a user’s design process. This pattern book will be developed through the research of four criterias in which the externalization strategies will be evaluated - ecological integration, climatic considerations, social/cultural considerations, and contextual application. The research will analyze each criteria through a series of case studies), literature review, and iterative design process (including simulation and BEM supported decision making). This will result in a holistic set of strategies that can address various contexts and scenarios, and serve as an useful tool when applying externalization strategies into architectural practice. Through this development, architectural practice can be enabled to shift towards a direction that better incorporates social and environmental resiliency through the implementation of building program externalization.



Author Information
Christina Brown, Carnegie Mellon University, United States
Vivian Loftness, Carnegie Mellon University, United States
Erica Cochran, Carnegie Mellon University, United States
Marantha Dawkins, Carnegie Mellon University, United States
Herbert Dreiseitl, Dreiseitl Consulting, Germany
Dana Cupkova, Carnegie Mellon University, United states

Paper Information
Conference: ACSEE2020
Stream: Social Sustainability and Sustainable Living

This paper is part of the ACSEE2020 Conference Proceedings (View)
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Posted by amp21