Taiwanese Cinema Development and Ruling over Indigenous Peoples in the Early Japanese Colonial Period

Abstract

Taiwanese cinema began in the era of Japanese rule. In the early days of Japanese Colony, indigenous peoples fought fiercely against the Japanese colonial government and ruling the indigenous areas became the primary work of the colonial government. On the one hand, the colonial government used military force and pressure to force indigenous peoples to submit. On the other hand, the colonial government adopted a conciliatory approach to educate indigenous peoples so that they could submit to the concept of Japanese rule and become citizens of the Japanization. For the measures of education, the colonial government actively used films as a tool to civilize indigenous peoples who were unable to speak or write in the ruler’s language, thus contributing to the origin of Taiwanese cinema. This study attempted to use the methods of historical data collection and literature analysis to re-examine Taiwan's early days of Japanese Colony when the colonial government introduced the then emerging film media to record the living conditions of indigenous peoples through film images, and to publicize the superiority of the international and Japanese social development at that time through the film's tour show mechanism in an attempt to deter indigenous peoples' resistance through these images and further carry out its ruling and educational purposes on indigenous peoples, and in this context, the development experience of Taiwanese cinema in colonial period was gradually initiated.



Author Information
Hsien-cheng Liu, Kun Shan University, Taiwan

Paper Information
Conference: ACAS2019
Stream: Comparative Studies of Asian and East Asian Studies

This paper is part of the ACAS2019 Conference Proceedings (View)
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