Impact on Short-term Mood by Two Factors of Browsing “Kawaii” Objects and Linguistic Communications

Abstract

It is a general behavior for people who have similar tastes to share their feelings about an object related to "kawaii" and to communicate linguistically. It seems that communication by utterance of "kawaii" has a positive effect on short-term mood by the action of relieving psychological stress, and it improves the adaptability of human relationships. An experiment was conducted to measure short-term mood changes by two factors ‒ viewing images considered "kawaii" or not, and with or without communication when image viewing - and the results were evaluated by analysis of variance. I compared both groups with pair of participants and a single participant in the situation of viewing images of "kawaii" impression including baby-schema. The moods of the experiment participants were measured using TDMS. As a result, the degree of activity, comfort, and arousal was increased when there was communication. The vitality increased after viewing images with a high impression of "kawaii", and participants became comfortable and active. However, in the case of viewing images with a low impression of "kawaii", there was no change after viewing the images regardless of whether it was with or without of communication, indicating that the communication had no effect. This suggests that only linguistic communication related to "kawaii" may amplify pleasure emotions. In terms of gender difference, the same results as those of all the experiment participants were seen in males, but in the case of females, viewing images with a low "kawaii" impression made them feel uncomfortable and depressed, regardless of communication. Therefore, for females, it was found that the image condition affects the short-term mood more than the communication condition.



Author Information
Masako Nunokawa, Hokkaido University Graduate School, Japan

Paper Information
Conference: ACP2021
Stream: Linguistics, Language & Psychology/Behavioral Science

This paper is part of the ACP2021 Conference Proceedings (View)
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Posted by amp21